Stephanie Fang

This semester’s add/drop/swap period will commence on Monday, Dec. 3 rather than Thursday, Nov. 29, the date that it was originally scheduled to begin. The period will stay open until Tuesday, Jan. 22.

University administrators made this change to add/drop/swap after recognizing that they had made a scheduling mistake when they originally planned it.

According to Steve Savage, the communications specialist for the Office for Undergraduate Education, administrators traditionally schedule the add/drop/swap period to open on the first Monday that follows the enrollment appointments for first-year students.

However, he noted, during this year’s scheduling meetings, administrators accidentally moved the date to the day after pre-registration for classes — which they corrected after “one of the College departments noticed the error.”

“The primary reason for us correcting this date is to give departments time to review their enrollments and work with their declared majors to ensure that they are enrolled in courses that will allow them to fulfill major requirements,” Savage explained.

During add/drop/swap, students are able to add open classes to their schedules or drop classes in which they are currently enrolled that they no longer wish to take.

Additionally, students can switch classes in their schedule that they no longer want for those that have opened.

Citing the economics department as a “prime example,” Savage remarked that the date revision is especially important for “departments with high enrollments and large numbers of majors.”

“Additionally, the added time for departments to review enrollments allows them to see where they have the greatest demand,” Savage said. “In the past, this time has allowed departments to work with the faculty members to add additional sections of courses where there is significant demand.”

— By Stephanie Fang 

The Dobbs Market, located in the Dobbs University Center (DUC), will permanently extend its hours for the rest of the semester, removing the Late Night Option.

In addition, the Dobbs Market will host Premium Nights every Wednesday evening, offering students high-quality food options on a weekly basis.

For the remainder of the semester after Thanksgiving break, Dobbs Market will no longer offer a Late Night option.

Instead, it will remain open until 10 p.m. on weeknights.

In the past, the Dobbs Market, which is the main dining service on campus, stayed open until 8 p.m. and reopened for Late Night from 10 p.m. to 12 a.m on weeknights.

However, Food Advisory Committee at Emory (FACE) co-chairs, College sophomores Michael Sacks and Karoline Porcello, chose to explore the possibility of changing these hours due to student dissatisfaction and practical concerns regarding the Dobbs Market employees who worked during the Late Night hours.

In an Oct. 18 Wheel article, Sacks explained that employees who worked shifts during Late Night often had difficulty returning home because many workers did not finish their shifts until past midnight.

The last Metro Atlanta Regional Transit Authority (MARTA) bus, which many workers use to get home, leaves campus at 12:13 a.m.

These concerns prompted Sacks and Porcello to work directly with Emory Dining administrators to implement a four-day trial period from Nov. 12 to Nov. 15, during which Dobbs Market removed its Late Night option and extended operational hours from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.

According to Sacks and Porcello, student response to these changes has been overwhelmingly positive.

Sacks and Porcello held a FACE meeting on Wednesday that was open to all students to address any issues they might have regarding the changes during the trial period.

“Our meeting was especially full,” Sacks said. “We actually had to turn some people away, and everyone seemed to support [the new hours] except for one girl. Everyone was very receptive to the new hours. Someone said it should have happened a long time ago.”

Porcello explained that she and Sacks asked the woman why she did not support the new hours for the Dobbs Market.

The woman responded that she did not know where she could eat after 10 p.m., whereby Porcello and Sacks “pointed her towards Zaya, Woodruff, Dunkin’ [Donuts] and other places that are open.”

During the four-day trial period, the Dobbs Market also implemented its first Premium Night, which, according to Sacks and Porcello, will continue every Wednesday evening.

The Premium Night, which took place this Wednesday, offered steak as well as vegetarian options.

Students interested in the premium options paid five Dooley Dollars in addition to using a meal swipe.

Sacks said she received positive feedback about the premium meals.

“I’ve heard raving reviews about the steak,” Sacks said. “For an extra five Dooley Dollars, people were very happy to get a fancy meal.”

Sacks and Porcello noted that they will also survey students to see which night of the week works best for Premium Night.

They will also consider the possibility of adding additional Premium Nights each week, depending on student feedback.

However, in order for Dobbs Market to permanently remove its Late Night option and extend its operational hours next semester, Emory University’s food service provider Sodexo must first approve the changes.

— Contact Stephanie Fang at

fang.fang@emory.edu

By Stephanie Fang

News Co-Editor

 

The Dobbs Market, located in the Dobbs University Center (DUC), will permanently extend its hours for the rest of the semester, removing the Late Night Option.

In addition, the Dobbs Market will host Premium Nights every Wednesday evening, offering students high-quality food options on a weekly basis.

For the remainder of the semester after Thanksgiving break, Dobbs Market will no longer offer a Late Night option.

Instead, it will remain open until 10 p.m. on weeknights.

In the past, the Dobbs Market, which is the main dining service on campus, stayed open until 8 p.m. and reopened for Late Night from 10 p.m. to 12 a.m on weeknights.

However, Food Advisory Committee at Emory (FACE) co-chairs, College sophomores Michael Sacks and Karoline Porcello, chose to explore the possibility of changing these hours due to student dissatisfaction and practical concerns regarding the Dobbs Market employees who worked during the Late Night hours.

In an Oct. 18 Wheel article, Sacks explained that employees who worked shifts during Late Night often had difficulty returning home because many workers did not finish their shifts until past midnight.

The last Metro Atlanta Regional Transit Authority (MARTA) bus, which many workers use to get home, leaves campus at 12:13 a.m.

These concerns prompted Sacks and Porcello to work directly with Emory Dining administrators to implement a four-day trial period from Nov. 12 to Nov. 15, during which Dobbs Market removed its Late Night option and extended operational hours from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.

According to Sacks and Porcello, student response to these changes has been overwhelmingly positive.

Sacks and Porcello held a FACE meeting on Wednesday that was open to all students to address any issues they might have regarding the changes during the trial period.

“Our meeting was especially full,” Sacks said. “We actually had to turn some people away, and everyone seemed to support [the new hours] except for one girl. Everyone was very receptive to the new hours. Someone said it should have happened a long time ago.”

Porcello explained that she and Sacks asked the woman why she did not support the new hours for the Dobbs Market.

The woman responded that she did not know where she could eat after 10 p.m., whereby Porcello and Sacks “pointed her towards Zaya, Woodruff, Dunkin’ [Donuts] and other places that are open.”

During the four-day trial period, the Dobbs Market also implemented its first Premium Night, which, according to Sacks and Porcello, will continue every Wednesday evening.

The Premium Night, which took place this Wednesday, offered steak as well as vegetarian options.

Students interested in the premium options paid five Dooley Dollars in addition to using a meal swipe.

Sacks said she received positive feedback about the premium meals.

“I’ve heard raving reviews about the steak,” Sacks said. “For an extra five Dooley Dollars, people were very happy to get a fancy meal.”

Sacks and Porcello noted that they will also survey students to see which night of the week works best for Premium Night.

They will also consider the possibility of adding additional Premium Nights each week, depending on student feedback.

However, in order for Dobbs Market to permanently remove its Late Night option and extend its operational hours next semester, Emory University’s food service provider Sodexo must first approve the changes.

— By Stephanie Fang

Emory’s Transportation and Parking Services will implement a series of changes to NightOwl and regular campus shuttle routes on Nov. 1.

A primary change involves expanding the NightOwl route so that these shuttles also run to the parking deck at Michael Street as well as the Woodruff Residential Center and certain destinations along Clifton Road to Houston Mill Road.

Prior to this change, the NightOwl only provided service to Starvine Parking Deck on Clairmont Campus, the Peavine parking deck on Eagle Row and Woodruff Circle, the traffic area behind the Dobbs University Center (DUC).

The NightOwl shuttle typically runs from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Mondays through Thursdays, from 8 p.m. to 3 a.m. on Fridays and from 11 p.m. to 3 a.m. on Saturdays — after the regular campus shuttle has stopped running for the night, according to the Transportation and Parking Services’ website.

According to Alice Sloan, the communications coordinator for Transportation and Parking Services, administrators believe that the expansions to the late night service “will be helpful.”

“We have been reviewing routing options for several months,” Sloan said, adding that administrators considered several factors when deciding how to re-route the NightOwl shuttle stops. “We look at physical barriers since buses aren’t able to travel on all streets and through all intersections on campus.”

Administrators sent out a campus-wide survey and hosted a series of focus groups last spring to determine student and community transportation needs.

They used the feedback from the survey and focus group discussions, as well as “ridership counts,” to decide how to change and expand the NightOwl routes as well as the routes of regular campus shuttles.

For some students, the expanded NightOwl route will be especially convenient in light of recent crimes in the area. For example, a male Emory student was the victim of a robbery in Emory Village on Sunday, Sept. 30.

In addition, administrators have received reports in the last week of theft and physical assault around campus, the Wheel reported on Oct. 25.

“I can feel more comfortable traveling throughout campus in the later hours and avoiding any chance of being attacked or jumped on the way,” noted College sophomore Irene Byun, who currently lives at the Woodruff Residential Center.

Byun remarked that her walk home from the Robert W. Woodruff Library, where she sometimes does homework in the evening, is often difficult and time-consuming due to the fact that the Woodruff Residential Center is “far away from main campus.” She added that the walk from her residence hall to main campus could even sometimes be “painful in colder weather,” making the expanded NightOwl route a boon.

“The [expanded route] will make everything more accessible,” she said.

Sloan explained that University administrators will also re-route several other shuttles that run during regular hours, changing as well as adding stops on campus.

For instance, shuttles will no longer stop at the Lowergate parking decks, located near the Burlington Road Building; rather, they will stop on Uppergate Drive in order to accommodate Emory University Hospital construction on Lowergate Drive.

“Several infrastructure changes have been made in anticipation of this move, including the improvements to Woodruff Circle, improvements along Uppergate [Drive] and also improvements at the intersection at Uppergate [Drive] and Clifton [Road],” said Sloan.

She noted that administrators hope this particular change will increase pedestrian traffic safety in the area as construction progresses.

— Stephanie Fang 

Administrators received reports of a theft that occurred on campus and a physical assault that occurred in a neighborhood near campus. Both incidents occurred yesterday afternoon, according to a University-wide email.

The theft occurred in front of Alabama Residence Hall at about 3:50 p.m. Two male perpetrators, both of whom remain at large, responded to an online advertisement that a male student had posted, according to the email. The perpetrators agreed to meet the student in front of Alabama so that he could sell them his old cell phone. However, the subjects snatched the cell phone as soon as the student had placed it on a table in front of them and ran from the area. One of the subjects reportedly punched the student after he began to run after them; both subjects ran down Dickie Drive toward Eagle Row, according to the email.

The student described the assailants as two black males — one described as wearing a white shirt and blue jeans, approximately 5 feet 5 inches, 130 pounds with short hair and a dark birthmark between his eyebrows.

The other subject reportedly was wearing a T-shirt of unknown color and blue jeans, approximately 5 feet 7 inches, 150 pounds and had a “low-cut hair style.”

No weapon was involved in the incident.

Approximately 28 minutes later, another incident occurred in a neighborhood near campus. A teenage male reported to DeKalb County that he was walking along Springdale Road at 4:18 p.m. when he was accosted by two males. The assailants proceeded to push him to the ground before grabbing both his backpack and cell phone.

The victim described the assailants as black males, both of whom wore white shirts and black pants, according to the email. One subject was approximately 5 feet 10 inches to 6 feet in height with a goatee beard and waist-length dreadlocks. The other subject was “shorter in height with a slim build.” No weapon was involved in this incident either.

University administrators encourage anyone who knows of any information pertaining to either of these two incidents to contact the DeKalb County Police Department at 770-724-7850 or the Emory Police Department at 404-727-6111.

— Stephanie Fang

Students eager to sample new food options other than those on campus or located in Emory Village will now have even more choices at the Emory Point complex, which announced last week that it has signed on three more restaurants.

Emory Point — located across from the Centers for Disease Control on Clifton Road — will add Burgerfi, a gourmet burger restaurant that also serves artisan beers and wines; Bonefish Grill, which will serve seafood and grilled foods; and Paradise Biryani Pointe, a restaurant that specializes in Indian, Persian and Middle Eastern cuisines.

Besides these new additions, Emory Point will also include other eateries such as The General Muir, La Tagliatella, Marlow’s Tavern and Tin Lizzy’s, according to an Oct. 11 article in the DeKalb Neighbor.

College junior Emily Bloom expressed excitement about these new additions to Emory Point. She noted that the restaurants could be more convenient for students living or taking classes on the part of campus closer to Clifton Road.

“Campus is big; so, there’s now somewhere you can go to lunch on each side of it,” said Bloom, who added that going to restaurants at Emory Point would be easier for some students than walking to the Village.

College senior Ciara Fortson also said she hopes the choices at Emory Point will provide a respite from offerings on campus and in the Village.

“I think the food options get a little repetitive,” she said. “I’m excited for Indian food ‘cause they don’t have much of that around this area.”

In addition, developers announced that the complex — which is managed by Cousins Properties Inc. and Gables Residential — will also add two new women’s boutiques, LOFT and Francesca’s Collections. These shops will supplement several others — including Lizard Thicket, American Threads, JoS A. Bank Clothiers and CVS.

According to the DeKalb Neighbor, Emory Point is “82 percent committed,” meaning that room remains for additional shops and restaurants. Those already at the development will begin “staggered openings” in November.

“[We] believe that the shops and restaurants will have a positive impact on the surrounding neighborhoods and communities,”said Mike Cohn, the vice president for Cousins Properties, in the DeKalb Neighbor article.

— By Stephanie Fang

Dobbs University Center’s (DUC) Dobbs Market, the main dining service on campus, will remove its Late Night dining option for four days in November, starting on the 12th and ending on the 15th.

This temporary suspension will serve as a trial run for an initiative by the Food Advisory Committee at Emory (FACE). In addition, the DUC will remain open until 10 p.m., two hours later than its current closing time of 8 p.m., in order to accommodate students who would have otherwise gone to Late Night.

Depending on student feedback after this trial, the DUC may choose to permanently implement these changes.

FACE co-chairs and College sophomores Michael Sacks and Karoline Porcello began developing this initiative as a response to what they felt was a significant amount of student dissatisfaction with the DUC’s current hours.

“In the past year, people have been complaining that the hours for the DUC have been really bad,” Sacks said.

According to Sacks, the DUC’s closing time has made it difficult for students in sports or clubs whose practices and meetings finish after 8 p.m. to “get a quality meal.” He noted that once the DUC closes, hungry students are limited to the WRec Room at Woodruff Residential Center and Zaya’s Mediterranean Restaurant, in terms of on-campus dining.

“The reason we started these DUC changes is because we went around and surveyed people, and the number one complaint was the hours of the DUC,” Porcello remarked. “They’d come at 7:30 p.m. and [the DUC] would be closing down, and there weren’t many options.”

As a result, Sacks and Porcello met with administrators from Emory Dining Services as well as Sodexo, Emory’s food provider, and devised these plans to change DUC dining hours. They also suggested that the DUC remove Late Night due to the fact that very few students took advantage of the food option.

“When it comes down to it, Late Night attendance is really low — [approximately] 200 people a night, which is actually really bad,” Sacks commented, adding that he thought the hours for Late Night are also inconvenient for DUC employees.

Sacks explained that many DUC employees use public transportation to commute to and from work. However, because Late Night currently closes at 12 a.m., many workers don’t finish their shifts until 12 a.m. or 1 a.m. On weeknights, the last Metro Atlanta Regional Transportation Authority (MARTA) bus leaves Emory’s campus at 12:13 a.m.

This, according to Sacks, means that “it’s really hard for [workers] to get around.”

The new hours would allow DUC employees to return home earlier, he hoped. Sacks also stressed that the longer hours would not affect the cost of food because “it’s still the same amount of hours of operation.”

“If anything, it’s even better because [the DUC] doesn’t have to close and reopen,” he said, referring to the two-hour period after 8 p.m. during which the DUC normally stays closed before Late Night begins.

Following the four-day trial period, Sacks and Porcello will examine attendance numbers to determine how many students took advantage of the longer DUC hours. Then, they will work with administrators to decide whether to implement these changes for the rest of the semester — permanently extending dining hours and removing the Late Night program.

According to Sacks and Porcello, FACE is also considering the possibility of having the DUC offer what they called “Premium Nights.”

This would mean that, on certain nights, the DUC would offer what they described as premium options such as “high-quality meats like steak or lobster,” said Porcello.

Students interested in these options would pay approximately six Dooley Dollars in addition to using one meal swipe, according to Porcello. They would then receive a coupon, enabling them to choose from any of the regular food options at the DUC as well as the premium.

“The idea is that this extra money [that will] come in allows them to produce much higher-quality food,” Sacks said, referring to the six Dooley Dollar surcharge for premium options. “The manager of the DUC said that it will be higher quality than what you get at most restaurants.”

On these nights, the DUC would also offer premium vegetarian options at no additional cost.

The DUC will offer one of these premium nights during the four-day trial period in November, during which it will also extend operational hours and remove Late Night.

If student feedback is positive, FACE will work on implementing more Premium Nights next semester as well as gathering student suggestions for food options during these nights.

“It’s all about what we hear back from students,” Porcello explained. “The [DUC] staff is really willing to mold to what students want.”

— By Stephanie Fang

A male Emory student was the victim of a robbery in the Emory Village area Sunday morning, according to a Sept. 30 University public safety notice.

The incident took place at approximately 12:40 a.m. as the victim was walking through an alleyway between businesses in the Village. According to the public safety notice, he was accosted by five males who exited a parked vehicle and approached him.

One of the five male subjects had a handgun, which he pointed at the victim before taking his backpack. According to the public safety notice, the victim was unharmed except for bruises on his arms.

In addition, he was able to describe one of the subjects as a 5-foot 6-inch tall black male  who weighed approximately 150 pounds. This particular subject also had a dark complexion and wore a gray T-shirt and jeans.

The victim could not provide a clothing description for the other four subjects. The public safety notice stated that after the robbery, the subjects fled the area in their vehicle, which was described as a silver van with three rows of seats and tinted windows.

— By Stephanie Fang

University administrators expect the College to end this fiscal year with a balanced budget, marking the first time since 2008 that it has not emerged with a deficit.

In the past, the College used money from its reserve accounts to cover any deficits it incurred in a particular year. The College placed excess funds from any year it had a budget surplus into this account, which held approximately $9 million in 2008.

In an interview with the Wheel, Michael Mandl, the executive vice president for finance and administration, remarked that the College has not had a budget surplus for the last three years.

As a result, the College no longer holds any money in its reserve accounts. According to Charlotte Johnson, the senior vice provost of administration, the College has depleted these funds by using them to cover recent deficits.

In the past, reserve funds were used for faculty recruitment and renovations as well as other operating costs, she wrote in an email to the Wheel. Mandl remarked that each University school and academic subdivision has a reserve account.

These accounts are crucial for each school, which uses their reserve monies for “very important, strategic, one-time purposes,” he said.

“Traditionally, if a school has a revenue shortfall or unusual expense in any given year, the first task is for them to look to their reserves to keep themselves whole,” explained Mandl, who added that the University has its own reserve account.

Johnson noted that the University reserves account “has been essentially zero” for the past two to three years. She said that the University was forced to use a significant portion of its “center resources” to help out its individual schools affected by the averse “market conditions” that followed the 2008 financial crisis.

The University distributes approximately $32 million in central funding to its various schools — the majority of which goes to the Laney Graduate School (LGS) and the College, according to Johnson.

These funds come from the annual total University endowment and trusts, which is currently about $5.3 billion.

In particular, the College, whose current endowment totals $406 million, has received a total of $12 million since 2008 from the University to help it cover its recent deficits because it has not had sufficient funds to do so it on its own.

However, after the College received central support for its deficit at the end of the last fiscal year, the University collaborated with College administrators in order to develop a more sustainable financial model for the school.

“The basic terms [to this central support] were these are one-time dollars and not to be the solution to the deficit problem in the College,” said Earl Lewis, the University provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, in a separate interview with the Wheel. “The College can’t be taking funds from the central University on a continuous basis. They had to figure out some kind of way to not keep having a deficit.”

According to Mandl, administrators expect that the College’s new financial model, which mandates that it “invest in the highest priorities,” will allow for it to have a balanced budget at the end of each fiscal year. Robin Forman, dean of the College, announced his plan for academic reorganization in a Sept. 14 University-wide email.

This plan, which goes into effect at the end of this academic year, will gradually phase out certain undergraduate programs and departments.

In addition, the plan will enact a moratorium on admissions to graduate programs in economics, Spanish and in the University’s Institute of Liberal Arts.

The College supplements the funding from LGS that goes towards fellowships for graduate students who do not receive external grants.However, College faculty members who also teach graduate courses receive their salaries entirely from the College.

This is because these “graduate students [support] the faculty” often with research assistance, according to Mandl.

“There’s a mutual benefit — a symbiotic relationship,” said Mandl. “You can’t really separate that totally from the undergraduate experience because graduate students interact with undergraduate members [of the University].”

Johnson explained that the University has allocated $12.1 million to the College “in support for the restructuring plan at the end of 2012” and had earmarked an additional $11.7 million in support for the next three fiscal years.

Administrators in the College expect to reallocate funds towards other academic areas — such as establishing committees and additional classes on neuroscience, digital media and contemporary Chinese studies, Forman remarked during a presentation given to the Wheel editorial board.

“The College looks to its future, and there are some areas in which it knows it needs to invest,” Lewis commented. “You can’t imagine a liberal arts college in the 21st century that doesn’t have a collection of scholars working on China, and we have a growing number of faculty in the College working on neuroscience, and that number will continue to grow.”

According to Lewis, the College — which derives approximately 80 percent of its revenues from tuition — also expects to control its expenses by reducing the amount that it spends in certain administrative areas.

By Stephanie Fang 

When Otto Lenhart opened his email last Friday morning, he saw a message he thought was so bizarre that it had to be a joke.

The email — sent by Elena Pesavento, chair of the economics department — said the University planned to suspend the graduate economics program.

For Lenhart, who had started his second year of studies in the program just a few weeks before, this news came as a total shock.

According to Lenhart, the graduate program in economics had improved its reputation significantly during the last five years.

“A week ago, they announced that we had [our] highest ranking ever, in the top 50,” he said. “The weird thing was that we had a meeting of the [economics] department, and everyone was happy because this was a really good development.”

Edouard Wemy, a fourth-year graduate student in the economics program, also recalled the praise that the department received from Laney Graduate School (LGS) administrators for their recent improvements and rise in rankings by the Southeastern Economics Journal.

“[The chair of the economics department] mentioned that [LGS] is so proud of the department, and the school encourages us to continue our pursuit for academic excellence,” Wemy said. “Then, on Friday, a bomb is dropped.”

Though current economics doctoral (Ph.D) students will be able to finish their degrees, the University will discontinue any new admissions to the program, according to a Sept. 14 University statement.

Emory has also suspended admissions to the graduate programs in educational studies, Spanish and the Institute of Liberal Arts (ILA).

The press release explains that these changes will begin at the end of this academic year and conclude by the end of the 2016-17 academic year.

In the days following this announcement, graduate students across the University have come together in opposition of these changes, which the LGS made in conjunction with the College.

Luke Donahue, a graduate student in the comparative literature department, created a Facebook event to organize a “meeting to discuss Emory Graduate School’s recent cuts” on the University Quadrangle, the page states.

Donahue declined to comment on any involvement he might have had with the event.

The meeting, which took place yesterday afternoon, gathered approximately 350 graduate and undergraduate students as well as administrators and faculty onto the Quad. to voice their opinions about these ongoing developments.

Amidst chants of “stop the cuts” and “how about democracy,” student speakers led those who attended in discussions on ways to move forward.

Administrators, including College Dean Robin Forman and Senior Vice President and Dean of Campus Life Ajay Nair, were also in attendance.

“I am almost on the verge of tears,” said Sarah Melton, a graduate student at the ILA who attended the event. “I have been so thankful that so many people across the University have spoken in solidarity. This decision is a decision that affects the most vulnerable staff, faculty [and] students. Shame on you. No, you do not have my permission to do this.”

Those against the changes have also reached out to the Emory community through various social media outlets, such as Facebook and Twitter.

The “Future of the Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts” had more than 600 members as of yesterday.

Members created the group “as a way to streamline communications among all the people working together to organize students in the ILA, alums, and supporters” to respond to program changes.

In addition, the “Save the Economics PhD Program” Facebook group, which an undergraduate student started late last week after administrators first announced the cuts, now has over 1,700 members.

Students and faculty have used this Facebook group to disseminate an online petition against the moratorium on the economics Ph.D program — which had approximately 600 signatures as of yesterday.

Some of those opposed to these developments have also created a Twitter account under the name @EmoryCuts, which is geared toward posting articles and sharing more information about the announcements from administration and how students have responded.

The Twitter account, which began posting on Sept. 16, currently has more than 100 followers.

Contributing Writer Dustin Slade contributed reporting. 

— By Stephanie Fang 

On any typical afternoon at Emory University, the campus is rife with students relaxing in between classes and meetings – chatting with friends or squeezing in quality time with significant others to relieve stress during an otherwise hectic day.
As a third-year graduate student in the Laney Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Karen McCarthy normally has a fairly busy schedule. However, she spends the majority of whatever free time she has on campus with her girlfriend.
“[My girlfriend and I] hold hands and kiss goodbye and all of that other sappy stuff people who are crazy for each other do,” said McCarthy, who studies in the Philosophy department. “No one I know has ever been less than happy for us, and we’ve never encountered anything like harassment.”
McCarthy, who came out approximately 10 years ago, identifies as a member of the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) community at Emory, an environment where she said she feels “perfectly safe” from most instances of homophobia.
Outside organizations have now taken notice of the University’s commitment to a healthy LGBT-community, and recently Campus Pride recognized Emory as having one of the top 25 most LGBT-friendly campuses in the country.
Campus Pride, a non-profit organization that collaborates with organizations and leaders at colleges across the nation to generate support for LGBT students, worked with the Huffington Post to rank 339 colleges, according to an Aug. 21 Huffington Post statement.
Emory University was the only institution in the southest to make the list.
According to Michael Shutt, the director of Emory’s Office of LGBT Life, Emory has always implemented progressive policies and programs geared towards increasing inclusion and fostering a positive environment for the University members who identify as LGBT. He added that Emory was the first university in the Southeast to open an Office of LGBT Life 21 years ago.
“We set a bar at that point in time because we were also the 10th [university] in the nation to do that – to hire someone and provide resources,” Shutt said. “It was early on that we were doing that.”
In addition, Shutt mentioned that this year marks the 40th anniversary of Emory’s Gay Liberation Committee, a group founded on campus in 1972 after the Stonewall Riots, an event that drove the beginning of the gay rights movement. The Gay Liberation Committee seeks to empower what Shutt called “queer leadership” at Emory.
Despite efforts that the University has made towards creating a safe space on campus for the LGBT community, some students believe that the University still has much room to improve.
College senior and Emory Pride co-president Shu Ong explained that she believes administrators needed to “focus on educating Emory’s community as a whole” in order to further “create a safer and more conducive environment for LGBT individuals on campus.”
“There have been few reported cases of outright harassment of LGBT individuals on campus that I know of,” she said. “However, I would say that there is also a general sense of apathy towards LGBT issues on campus and while a large majority of students are tolerant, they may not necessarily be accepting.”
The Office of LGBT Life plans to work with different student groups to plan and host upcoming events that will help the University move forward in order to provide additional leadership opportunities and support systems for LGBT individuals at Emory, according to Shutt.
“Emory is not different from the real world,” Shutt said. “We know that our students are bumping up against sexism, racism, etc. everyday. What we want to do as an institution is ensure that we’re doing everything we can to remove barriers so that students can do everything they want to achieve.”

— By Stephanie Fang

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