Jordan Friedman

Police believe a woman has misidentified a Decatur resident as the suspect in the reported rape near Emory Village, police said on Monday.

According to a City of Decatur Police Department statement, a male resident of Decatur told police that he was on Erie Avenue near Clairemont Avenue in Decatur at the same date and time — Feb. 21 at around 2 p.m. — that the 17-year-old woman says she saw the suspect accused of raping a female Emory student earlier this month.

Based on interviews with both the male resident and the woman who said she spotted the suspect, investigators now believe that the male resident — not the suspect — is the man that the 17-year-old woman encountered on Saturday.

The suspect in the rape case is also possibly connected with three other open attempted sexual assault cases in DeKalb County, police said.

The Emory Police Department (EPD) released a composite sketch of the suspect this month.

The 17-year-old woman initially said that the man she encountered while walking was the same man as the one pictured in the sketch.

This woman had told police that she walked past the man on Erie Avenue as he walked in the opposite direction, and that the man subsequently turned around and started walking about two feet behind her until she went to a nearby church and waited before returning home.

Now, the male resident is saying that he remembers seeing a young woman “a short distance in front of him” who appeared nervous as he started walking in the other direction.

He told police that he had planned on crossing the street and walking on the other side “because the young lady seemed apprehensive, but she left the area before he had a chance,” the police statement says.

The male resident did not think much of the situation until he read an alert about the suspect in the rape case possibly being seen, police said.

Investigators believe the Decatur resident is the man that was encountered on Erie Avenue based on the location, time frame, physical and clothing descriptions and the details provided by both him and the 17-year-old woman, according to the police statement.

“We want to thank the complainant for being alert and the resident for coming forward to clear up the misunderstanding,” Decatur police said in a statement.

However, the statement adds, “This does NOT mean the suspect in the Emory University and DeKalb County assaults has been apprehended.”

Police will continue to share any potentially useful information with EPD and DeKalb police to assist in their joint investigation, according to the statement.

The suspect in the rape case is described as white and in his late 50s, with a slight hunch in his posture and unshaven.

At the time of the reported rape, police said, he was wearing an orange beanie cap, hoodie and blue jeans.

Anyone with any additional information is encouraged to contact the Decatur Police Department at (404) 373-6551.

— By Jordan Friedman

If you have been affected by sexual assault, abuse in a relationship or stalking, you have support at Emory. Contact Lauren (LB) Bernstein in the Respect Program in the Office of Health Promotion at 404-727-1514 or Lauren.Bernstein@emory.edu to schedule a confidential consultation.

The DeKalb County Police Department and Emory Police Department (EPD) have determined that the suspect in the reported rape near Emory Village last week may be linked to three open cases of attempted sexual assault that occurred in DeKalb County, according to a DeKalb County Police Department statement released Wednesday evening. The police departments are conducting a joint investigation.

The three other reported incidents occurred between December 2013 and January 2014 and involved young females who were walking alone in the Emory vicinity off campus, the statement says. The suspect “approached and attempted to overpower” the victims, according to the statement, which does not specify whether the victims have any affiliation with the University.

These victims were able to fight off the suspect and alert police, the police department said. They were not physically injured.

Last Tuesday, a female Emory student reported to EPD that she was raped near Emory Village in a wooded area between Oxford Road and Dowman Drive at around 11:15 p.m. A University-wide email alerted the Emory community about the reported incident last Wednesday.

The description of the suspect in the DeKalb County cases is consistent with a sketch that the Emory Village survivor provided to a Georgia Bureau of Investigation official. EPD released the sketch on Saturday night.

The suspect is described as a white male, about 5 feet 10 inches with medium build and around 50 years old. The University-wide email also specified that he has a reddish or brown beard and at the time of the reported incident was wearing a brown or green beanie cap, tan or brown jacket, dark blue jeans and brown boots.

“The community is encouraged to remain vigilant about their safety and exercise safety practices,” the DeKalb County Police Department said in the statement.

The statement encourages the Emory community to remain alert about their surroundings, including walking in groups at night, avoiding distractions such as texting or talking on the phone and avoiding “isolated and dimly lit areas.”

DeKalb and Emory authorities are “aggressively investigating” these cases, according to the statement, and are encouraging anyone with information about the suspect or anyone who may have been a victim to contact the DeKalb County Police Department’s Special Victims Unit at (770) 724-6111 or EPD at (404) 727-6111.

— By Jordan Friedman 

If you have been affected by sexual assault, abuse in a relationship or stalking, you have support at Emory. Contact Lauren (LB) Bernstein in the Respect Program in the Office of Health Promotion at 404-727-1514 or Lauren.Bernstein@emory.edu to schedule a confidential consultation.

Emory College undergraduate tuition will rise by 2.3 percent in the 2014-2015 academic year, marking the smallest percentage increase in the past decade, the University announced Wednesday.

The University’s Board of Trustees approved the increased tuition to $44,400 for next year from $43,400 this year, according to a University statement. Combined undergraduate tuition, fees, room and board will rise by 2.5 percent, to $57,768 from $56,370.

Claire Sterk, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said in the statement that the tuition increase “reflects Emory’s commitment to an excellent learning experience for our students” without them going into excessive debt.

“We know that students and their families make a tremendous investment in obtaining a world-class education at Emory,” Sterk said. “By holding down annual increases, while at the same time continuously enhancing the Emory experience, we deliver an extraordinary value proposition for extraordinary students.”

Oxford College will see a 4.2 percent increase in tuition and a 4.1 percent increase for the total tuition, fees, room and board.

Many other universities have yet to announce their tuitions for next year, but Washington University in St. Louis’ tuition will be $45,700 for 2014-2015, a 3.6 percent increase from the year before, according to a Jan. 24 Wash U. press release. Princeton’s tuition will rise by 4.1 percent to $55,440, the school said on its website.

According to the University statement, Emory “maintains a commitment to meet 100 percent of demonstrated financial need for admitted domestic undergraduates and their families,” and about 60 percent of Emory undergraduate students receive some form of financial aid.

Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has also ranked Emory 14th nationally as a “best value” among private universities. And, The Princeton Review has named Emory a “Best Value College.”

— By Jordan Friedman 

The DeKalb County Police Department and Emory Police Department (EPD) have determined that the suspect in the reported rape in Emory Village last week may be linked to three open cases of attempted sexual assault that occurred in DeKalb County, according to a DeKalb County Police Department statement released Wednesday evening. The police departments are conducting a joint investigation.

The three other reported incidents occurred between December 2013 and January 2014 and involved young females who were walking alone in the Emory vicinity off campus, the statement says. The suspect “approached and attempted to overpower” the victims, according to the statement, which does not specify whether the victims have any affiliation with the University.

These victims were able to fight off the suspect and alert police, the police department said. They were not physically injured.

Last Tuesday, a female Emory student reported to EPD that she was raped near Emory Village in a wooded area between Oxford Road and Dowman Drive at around 11:15 p.m. A University-wide email alerted the Emory community about the reported incident last Wednesday.

The description of the suspect in the DeKalb County cases is consistent with a sketch that the Emory Village survivor provided to a Georgia Bureau of Investigation official. EPD released the sketch on Saturday night.

The suspect is described as a white male, about 5 feet 10 inches with medium build and around 50 years old. The University-wide email also specified that he has a reddish or brown beard and at the time of the reported incident was wearing a brown or green beanie cap, tan or brown jacket, dark blue jeans and brown boots.

“The community is encouraged to remain vigilant about their safety and exercise safety practices,” the DeKalb County Police Department said in the statement.

The statement encourages the Emory community to remain alert about their surroundings, including walking in groups at night, avoiding distractions such as texting or talking on the phone and avoiding “isolated and dimly lit areas.”

DeKalb and Emory authorities are “aggressively investigating” these cases, according to the statement, and are encouraging anyone with information about the suspect or anyone who may have been a victim to contact the DeKalb County Police Department’s Special Victims Unit at (770) 724-6111 or EPD at (404) 727-6111.

— By Jordan Friedman

If you have been affected by sexual assault, abuse in a relationship or stalking, you have support at Emory. Contact Lauren (LB) Bernstein in the Respect Program in the Office of Health Promotion at 404-727-1514 or Lauren.Bernstein@emory.edu to schedule a confidential consultation.

Sketch

The Emory Police Department (EPD) has released a composite sketch of a suspect in the alleged rape of a female Emory student that occurred near Emory Village last Tuesday.

According to a University-wide email sent to students last Wednesday, the student reported to EPD that she was raped in a wooded area between Dowman Drive and Oxford Road at around 11:15 p.m.

The sketch of the suspect was released Saturday night. The survivor was able to give a description of the assailant to an official at the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, which produced the sketch, according to a University statement.

The perpetrator was last seen running from campus toward Emory Village and is described as a white male in his mid-to-late 50s, about 5 feet 10 inches tall, according to the statement.

He has a reddish or brown beard along with a brown or green beanie cap, tan or brown jacket, dark blue jeans and brown boots.

EPD declined to comment as the case is currently under investigation.

“The Emory Police Department is investigating the report of a sexual assault Tuesday night involving an unknown perpetrator,” the University said in a statement to the Wheel last week. “The female student involved is being provided with the full support, resources and ongoing care of Emory staff members.”

The statement released this past weekend adds that while investigating the incident, “Emory Police have increased their visibility around the Emory campus.”

Last week’s University-wide email recommends that students use a safety escort service, walk with another person or in a group and avoid poorly lit areas, among other suggestions.

Anyone with information about the alleged incident is encouraged to contact EPD at 404-727-6111, the email says.

“Emory is deeply concerned about the safety of our campus and our students, faculty, staff and visitors, and maintaining a safe community is always of the utmost importance to the University,” the University said in its statement.

Crime Beat Writer Brandon Fuhr contributed reporting.

— By Jordan Friedman 

If you have been affected by sexual assault, abuse in a relationship or stalking, you have support at Emory. Contact Lauren (LB) Bernstein in the Respect Program in the Office of Health Promotion at 404-727-1514 or Lauren.Bernstein@emory.edu to schedule a confidential consultation.

Emory plans to file a motion for summary judgment in the H. Erik Butler discrimination case later this month, meaning a judge will determine whether sufficient evidence exists for the case to move to a jury trial, the University said in a statement to the Wheel. Meanwhile, a court document reveals Emory’s denials of many claims presented in Butler’s complaint.

In Butler’s 21-page lawsuit, filed in December 2012, he alleges that administrators denied him tenure in 2010 on the basis of his Jewish religion and his American national origin. The University, however, maintains that Butler was not granted tenure because of “legitimate concerns over his disruptive and antagonistic behavior,” according to an April 2013 complaint response obtained by the Wheel.

All of the case’s depositions and the “discovery” phase — which is when one party obtains evidence from the opposing party or a third party — have been completed, the University said via its communications office.

Emory will be permitted to file a brief of up to 35 pages in support of its motion for summary judgment, after which Butler will be able to submit a response of the same length, according to a court document.

Butler, an American Jewish male, was a German Studies assistant professor starting during the 2004-2005 academic year. He took an unpaid leave in fall 2007 and a paid leave in 2009.

Prior to filing his lawsuit, Butler filed discrimination charges with the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), both of which have criticized the University’s actions and supported Butler’s allegations in letters to administrators, the Wheel reported last January.

In the response, Emory also denies that the EEOC conducted a “fair, thorough or impartial” investigation of Butler’s claims.

Discrimination vs. Lack of ‘Collegiality’

Before administrators reviewed Butler’s file, the Tenure and Promotion Committee of the College found “a record of service that is solid at departmental, university and professional levels,” and voted unanimously to recommend Butler for tenure, according to Butler’s lawsuit.

However, Butler’s lawsuit alleges that former Provost Earl Lewis and University President James W. Wagner ultimately denied Butler tenure because of German Studies Department Chair and Associate Professor Peter Höyng’s “bias” against Butler.

Butler’s lawsuit says Höyng “framed” his criticisms of Butler as a lack of “collegiality.” In August 2009, Butler informed Emory through a letter from his attorney that Höyng was using collegiality concerns as a “subterfuge for engaging in ethnic discrimination.”

But Emory maintains that Höyng’s concerns “were founded on good faith and honestly held beliefs regarding the damage Dr. Butler’s unprofessional behavior could cause the Department,” the response to the complaint says.

For example, the complaint response says, Butler “was frequently and openly dismissive of his colleagues and the Department [of German Studies] as a whole.”

The complaint response also claims that some female faculty members were “offended” by a poster on his office door “that students and faculty alike might find misogynistic.” He removed the poster after a complaint from a colleague, the response says.

Some of Butler’s other colleagues shared similar “collegiality” concerns as Höyng, according to the complaint response, but disagreed about the weight that Butler’s behavior should play in the tenure process.

According to the response, some of these faculty members noted that Butler’s “negative attitude” might have occurred after he felt he was “treated unfairly” in his Fourth Year Review for tenure, in which Höyng raised the issue of collegiality.

Other faculty members in the department disagreed about when this behavior began, the response says.

“All [faculty] members agreed that it was difficult to reconcile [Butler’s] dismissive criticism of the Department with his valuable contributions to it,” according to the Department’s recommendation letter for Butler, as quoted in the response.

Four faculty members ultimately rated Butler’s service as “satisfactory,” while two — one of whom included Höyng — rated his service “unsatisfactory,” according to court documents.

Still, Butler’s lawsuit claims that Höyng’s criticisms in his Fourth Year Review contradict from the positive evaluation of Butler he gave in 2006-2007. The complaint response says collegiality is a requirement for tenure at Emory as well as at many higher education institutions across the country.

Additional Claims and Responses

Moreover, the lawsuit says Butler’s research focused on “dark episodes” of Germany’s history as well as xenophobia, or a fear of foreigners, and also mentions that Höyng is a “native German and is not Jewish,” unlike Butler who is American and Jewish.

The complaint response acknowledges that Höyng was born in Germany but notes that he is a U.S. citizen. While Höyng is not Jewish, the response adds, he has “actively supported the development of German/Jewish studies in the Department.”

Therefore, Emory denies the lawsuit’s allegation that Höyng discriminated against Butler for the topics he researched, the document says.

Emory also says in the complaint response that the University does not have enough evidence to form an opinion about the allegation that Lewis, Emory’s former provost, “horrified” members of the Departmental Tenure Review Committee when he arranged a telephone conference with them to discuss Butler’s case. That claim is therefore denied.  The lawsuit describes Lewis’ action as a “highly unusual and inappropriate step” in the tenure review process.

Butler and the EEOC

The EEOC aims to enforce federal employment discrimination laws, according to its website.

Before approaching the EEOC, Butler filed a discrimination complaint to Emory’s Office of Equal Opportunity Programs (EOP), which found no discrimination after an investigation, according to Butler’s  lawsuit.

However, in a March 2012 letter to the University regarding the matter, Director of the EEOC’s Atlanta District Office Bernice Williams-Kimbrough wrote that there is “reasonable cause” to conclude that Butler was denied tenure for discriminatory reasons.

Though Butler’s lawsuit says he had filed a “timely charge” of discrimination with the EEOC, the complaint response claims that Butler failed to submit the charge within the appropriate timeframe.

According to the EEOC’s website, a charge must be filed within 180 calendar days from the day the discrimination occurred.

Additionally, the EEOC opposed the deposition of David Hendrickson, an EEOC investigator, on “numerous grounds,” according to a court document.

A judge ruled that Hendrickson would be required to answer questions about internal discussions he may have had with EEOC attorneys but not on “privileged information or issues,” according to a court order. His deposition was completed last month.

— By Jordan Friedman

Updated Feb. 4 at 12:38 a.m.

Follow Jordan Friedman on Twitter @jmfriedman8

The University has settled its lawsuit with Melissa Sexton, the former community research postdoctoral fellow who alleged in her complaint that an administrator fired her in 2012 for discriminatory reasons, according to court documents.

Both the University and Sexton’s lawyer Matthew Billips also confirmed that a settlement has been reached. A joint notice of settlement filed Jan. 2 says that as of that date, the two parties were in the process of finalizing an agreement.

Nancy Seideman, Emory’s interim vice president for communications and marketing, wrote in an email to the Wheel that “the terms of the settlement are confidential.” Billips declined to comment on any specifics.

In her lawsuit, Sexton claimed that Ozzie Harris, former senior vice provost for community and diversity, exhibited “discriminatory conduct” during verbal altercations with her that ultimately led to Sexton being fired.

The lawsuit further alleged that other employees had previously told Sexton that Harris discriminated against women.

Sexton’s lawsuit specifically accuses Harris of firing Sexton because she objected to Harris promoting a much-less qualified male candidate to a position in which she had expressed interest, and for responding to and disagreeing with comments Harris made about women not immediately reporting instances of rape or sexual harassment.

Harris is no longer employed by the University as of Oct. 7, the Wheel reported, though the University declined to comment on whether the lawsuit was related to his departure from Emory.

Sexton, meanwhile, worked at Emory for more than a decade. She held multiple positions at the University and helped lead the Transforming Community Project, which studies and aims to promote dialogue on race history.

—By Jordan Friedman

Follow Jordan Friedman on Twitter @jmfriedman8

Ana Abreu-Velez, a former Emory postdoctoral fellow, is suing Emory University and Georgia Regents University. In her complaint, she alleges that officials and employees at the schools conspired to damage her reputation after she exposed safety and legality issues with clinical trials conducted at Georgia Regents.

Representatives from both schools strongly deny the claims, saying they are without merit.

In the 24-page lawsuit, filed Dec. 18 and obtained by the Wheel, Abreu-Velez alleges that the retaliation against her involved attempting to thwart the renewal of her green card and planning attacks on her family and property.

Abreu-Velez claims in the lawsuit that this conspiracy resulted from her whistleblower activity, including reporting her concerns with clinical trials conducted at Georgia Regents, which was formerly known as the Medical College of Georgia. She disclosed issues with the trials to Georgia Regents officials and other employees, and later to the FBI and the Office of the U.S. Attorney, the lawsuit says.

The lawsuit was filed against the two schools as well as the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, which operates Georgia Regents.

Before becoming employed at Emory in 2005, according to the lawsuit, Abreu-Velez was a research assistant and study coordinator in the Department of Ophthalmology at Georgia Regents. Her employment was terminated in November 2004, which she alleges occurred after she disclosed her concerns with clinical trials conducted at the school, including one that involved radiation and “invasive surgery” and was funded by the pharmaceutical company Theragenics, Inc.

She was employed at Emory until 2007, and the University declined to release the reasons for her departure as per Emory policy.

Abreu-Velez — who declined to comment to the Wheel because the litigation is ongoing — says in the complaint that she believes Emory worked with Georgia Regents to damage her reputation and that both schools receive research grants from Theragenics.

Nancy Seideman, Emory’s interim vice president for communications and marketing, said records indicate that Theragenics only funded one study at the University from 2004 to 2010.

In a statement to the Wheel, Emory University said via its communications office, “Dr. Abreu-Velez has made unsupported and irresponsible allegations in her complaint, and her legal claims are completely meritless.” Seideman said she anticipates a Motion to Dismiss to be filed next week.

Jack Evans, Georgia Regents University’s associate vice president for communications and creative services, wrote in an email to the Wheel that Abreu-Velez’s allegations “are unsubstantiated and false.”

The matter has been referred to the Georgia Attorney General, and the Board of Regents has requested and obtained representation from the Attorney General’s Office, Evans wrote, adding that he also expects a Motion to Dismiss to be filed.

Abreu-Velez has filed the lawsuit pro se, according to the lawsuit, meaning she is defending herself without representation from a lawyer.

Emory is confident that the case will be dismissed, just as a similar lawsuit that she filed in 2005 was dismissed in 2009, according to the Emory University statement. She filed her previous lawsuit against the Board of Regents, Georgia Regents (then known as the Medical College of Georgia) and Dennis Marcus — the school’s former head of the Department of Ophthalmology — but not Emory.

The case was dismissed on the grounds that Abreu-Velez’s claims about retaliation for her reporting the issues with clinical trials was not sufficient for the case to go to a jury trial, according to a 28-page court order.

Abreu-Velez alleges in the recent lawsuit that the specific issues with the Theragenics clinical trials at Georgia Regents included illegal payments, inadequate measures taken to prevent exposure to radiation and the incorrect billing of study participants. She also alleges that Georgia Regents failed to report deaths and “severe adverse events” that resulted from the study.

Moreover, she claims that Georgia Regents violated federal and state laws, rules and regulations during the Theragenics trials as well as during other studies.

She believes, the lawsuit says, that the recent case of Elliot v. Emory University proves her assertions that Georgia Regents was improperly billing study participants. In Elliot, Emory paid $1.5 million to settle claims that some patients enrolled in clinical trial research at Emory’s Winship Cancer Institute were overbilled Medicare and Medicaid from 2001 to 2010, the Wheel reported in September.

According to the lawsuit, Abreu-Velez also believes that Thomas Lawley, former dean of the School of Medicine and current William P. Timmie Professor of Dermatology, resigned from his position as dean, and that some human resources employees were dismissed from the University, as a result of their involvement in the conspiracy against her.

When contacted by the Wheel, Lawley referred an inquiry to Emory’s communications office, which has denied the allegations. The Wheel reported in November 2011 that Lawley was stepping down after 16 years in that position.

And Abreu-Velez claims that Georgia Regents and Theragenics officials have resigned, and that U.S. Senator Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.) decided not to run again this year because of Abreu-Velez’s reports to the FBI and the Office of the U.S. Attorney. The lawsuit does not provide any specifics about Chambliss’ alleged involvement.

Chambliss’ spokeswoman Lauren Claffey wrote in an email to the Wheel, “I can assure you, Sen. Chambliss’ decision not to seek re-election this year was in no way influenced by Dr. Abreu-Velez’s claims.” A statement released by his office last January states that he is not running again due to his frustration with a “lack of leadership” from the White House and Congress in addressing U.S. economic issues.

Once Abreu-Velez became a postdoctoral fellow at Emory, the lawsuit claims, Lawley and employees in Emory’s Human Resources Department “interfered” with the processing of her green card renewal application.

Her application contained errors and missing documents, the lawsuit says, but does not elaborate on the alleged specific roles of each of these parties.

The lawsuit says that Abreu-Velez’s family has faced “multiple documented attacks” in the past several years, “which she believes were orchestrated by Emory University and [Georgia Regents].” For example, the lawsuit cites an example from 2006 in which her daughter was hospitalized for a month but does not offer specifics about the schools’ alleged involvement.

Additionally, Abreu-Velez claimed in both the current and previous lawsuits that Georgia Regents University refused to rehire her for any of the numerous jobs at the school for which she applied after she was terminated from her position in 2004.

Officials from Theragenics declined to comment.

— By Jordan Friedman

Follow Jordan Friedman on Twitter @jmfriedman8

Editor’s Note: While not required by law, the Wheel chose to remove Abreu-Velez’s contact information and address from the lawsuit for privacy reasons.

As the Philippines feels the devastating effects of Typhoon Haiyan, Emory students and administrators are working to aid those in need.

The typhoon, one of the strongest ever recorded for the region, has caused a death toll that has rapidly risen to higher than 4,000. Haiyan has destroyed homes and left hundreds of thousands displaced. It has left many people in other countries crossing their fingers and hoping for the best for their loved ones who might have been affected.

“We have a small number of Filipino International students here, but certainly it reaches and impacts many more students than just those who grew up in the Philippines,” Natalie Cruz, coordinator of the Office of International Student Life, wrote in an email to the Wheel.

Senior Vice President and Dean of Campus Life Ajay Nair has written a letter to Filipino students at Emory, stating, “Please know that you do not have to face these challenges alone. Being a part of a caring community means that we engage in uplifting those facing challenging circumstances such as these.”

Nair, in the letter, points to a number of resources that allow Emory to aid those impacted by crises, including Counseling and Psychological Services and Student Intervention Services.

Some students, though, are working with each other and the University to provide relief to those impacted by the catastrophe.

Cruz, whose office is new as of this fall, wrote that she is working with the Filipino Student Association (FSA) on relief efforts. FSA is planning a charity dinner for Saturday, Nov. 23, which will include a screening of next week’s Manny Pacquiao fight. Pacquiao is a professional Filipino boxer, whom FSA Co-President and College junior Tad Manalo described as a “national hero.”

“When he fights, traffic stops, crime goes down to zero, everyone is glued to the TV to watch … It’s a really powerful experience,” Manalo said.

FSA also had a table at the Dobbs University Center (DUC) Coca-Cola Commons yesterday afternoon, where they accepted donations that will go toward Philippines relief.

In addition, third-year Candler School of Theology student John Yeager has started fundraising for relief, with donations going through the United Methodist Committee on Relief. Initially, he planned for his campaign to last only a week and for just Candler students to participate. But now, he is trying to extend it through next week and he has received donations from individuals across the University.

He has placed a donation box on the second floor of the Candler School, which has thus far received $300. Money donated online has not yet been counted, he said.

“There are a lot of problems,” Yeager said. “It’s incredibly easy to see it on the news and have an immediate reaction to it and then keep drinking your Starbucks.”

For many students and alumni, the pain of the tragedy in the Philippines is all too real. Roshani Chokshi (‘13C), former managing editor of the Wheel, said some of her relatives — her grandmother’s brother, his wife and his son — have either been reported dead or have not yet had their bodies recovered.

“The real scary thing is not knowing anything at all,” Chokshi said. “The phone lines are really only working at 50 to 60 percent capacity. Everyone is trying to find someone they love.”

Editor-in-Chief Arianna Skibell, News Co-Editor Karishma Mehrotra and Copy Editor Mary Claire Kelly contributed reporting.

— By Jordan Friedman

Photo courtesy of Flickr, Mansunides

Get ready to trade in your bagels.

Emory will remove Einstein Bros Bagels from the Goizueta Business School on Nov. 27, but dining officials have yet to announce its replacement because a contract is still in the works.

The new food venue will likely be up and running by the time spring semester classes begin in January, said David Furhman, senior director of Emory Dining.

He said he will be able to announce the new venue as soon as Emory has a signed contract, presumably in the next week or immediately thereafter.

Once Einstein Bros closes and demolition begins, the B-School will set up a temporary table or cart in the school’s lobby to serve coffee and sandwiches, among other food items, for the remainder of the semester starting Dec. 2, according to Furhman.

The cart will be operated by Sodexo, Emory’s food vendor, said Karoline Porcello, B-School junior and Food Advisory Committee Emory (FACE) co-chair.

She added that Emory had expected to be able to announce the new venue by now but faced a few unexpected obstacles in the contract negotiation process.

The removal of Einstein Bros Bagels — which has been on campus for about a decade, according to Furhman — is part of an ongoing facelift that dining locations across campus are undergoing.

As the Wheel reported last semester, Emory and Sodexo are together evaluating food brands and venues to ensure that Emory Dining is meeting the needs of the community.

Emory already revamped the dining options in Cox Hall during the summer as part of the process.

“If [a venue] doesn’t really meet the needs of our community anymore and doesn’t offer the kind of variety our dining vision specifies, we’re going to replace it,” Furhman said of the plan.

During FACE town hall meetings and focus groups held last semester — during which members of the Emory community voiced opinions about what type of dining options they would like on campus — many expressed a desire to vary the food choices beyond just bagels, Furhman said.

At that point, Emory Dining turned its attention to the B-School Einstein Bros.

“Honestly, we heard, ‘Enough with the bagels; we’re tired of bagels,’” Furhman said.

Porcello said she could not comment on potential venues at this time but said that it will definitely be offering coffee, drinks and “delicious food.”

Furhman noted that Emory Dining is in the final negotiations stage for one specific venue but could not provide further information as to which venue it is.

News Co-Editor Dustin Slade contributed reporting.

— By Jordan Friedman

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